This Combination Machine is similar to the G0634Z This Combination Machine is similar to the G0634Z except it sports our popular Polar Bear colors. It also has an end-mounted fence so you can work as close to your shop wall as possible. This feature is a real space saver and since this is a combination machine you're saving ...  More + Product Details Close
After using the jigsaw on several projects I have to say it exceeds my expectations. I do not have a bandsaw and have used this jigsaw to process non-dimensioned stock then worked the material with hand planes into dimensional lumber. Most recently I found an 8/4 slab of cherry that was 10" wide and 9 feet long. Using this jigsaw and a guide I was able to bring the edges and ends into rough square then work the rest into full square with planes. My table saw is not safe with a long board such as this and this jigsaw left a reasonable cut with no danger of kickback.
The DEWALT DW745 is a smaller version of the DEWALT DWE7491RS. It’s still a good saw in its own right. It comes with a 15-amp motor, just like the larger unit, though it can only handle rips of up to 20”. You’ll experience the same power and consequently, the same speed as the larger model, though you can’t cut pieces as large. This model is also meant to be moved, and while it doesn’t have wheels, it has a metal roll cage that will help it survive travel without taking any damage.

As mentioned already, in this article, we are going to do a countdown of our Top 10 Best Woodworking Jigsaws 2020. The criteria for ranking these jigsaws will mostly be the same and even when we are ranking the jigsaws good for woodwork, you might find some which we can be used for multitasking as well. However, that would still be a rare case, especially for this list.
My Stanley 51/2 was in a bit of a state when I got it and refurbing it took a bit of time and cash. Now it works a treat and looks like new. I’m nearly through the bench build and have spend hours using it – it really is a workhorse piece of kit. I did some final cleaning up of some oak legs the other day and I can’t really see how a smaller plain would do a better job.

Woodworking expert Sandor Nagyszalanczy tested the best jigsaws on the market to determine what features worked well in the shop and which was best overall. I’ve always thought of a jigsaw as a sort of “poor man’s band saw.” During my early woodworking days when I lacked both the funds and space for a band saw, I used the best jigsaw I could find (I borrowed money from a friend to buy it). I used that jigsaw for all my curve cutting tasks, as well as the jobs a band saw couldn’t do: pocket cuts, inside circular cutouts, and all manner of trimming inside built-in cabinets and furniture. Nearly 35 years later, when it came time to pick a batch of jigsaws to review for Woodoworker's Journal, I was anxious to try out the “top-shelf” models offered by the best known power tool manufacturers. These include the best offerings from Bosch, DeWALT, Festool, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo and Milwaukee. The Porter-Cable 9543 was slated to be part of this group, but was, unfortunately, recently discontinued. I also tried to include a jigsaw made by the Swiss power tool company Hilti, but they chose not to participate in the article. Instead of discussing each saw individually, I will compare all of their attributes and cutting abilities in two sections: The first contrasts the features and accessories of the seven models. The second section describes the performance tests I put each jigsaw through and reports on how well each model fared.


While some people consider the circular saw to be more of a carpentry tool than a fine woodworking tool, but some would disagree. There may be no more versatile basic handheld power tool than a circular saw. When used with a clamp-on straight-edge, the circular saw can be just about as accurate as a table saw and handle quite a few of the tasks that one would attempt with a table saw, particularly cutting sheet goods such as plywood or medium-density fiberboard. When woodworking on a budget, a quality circular saw should be the first handheld power tool purchased, as it is the one that will likely be the most useful as you get started.
Solid tool, works fantastic. Before buying my own I borrowed several jig saws at different times for projects. They were always "eh, it'll work". I'm glad I bought this for myself. Don't have to borrow anything and this jigsaw is vastly superior to the ones I was borrowed. Cuts straight, easier to change the blade, more power behind you (looks cool too) and comes with a nice case to boot.
The other kind of portable table saw is the wheeled/folding leg variety. The wheeled models come with wheels that can be used to roll them for place to place. The folding leg variety may or may not have wheels. Both models feature a mechanism by which they can be raised up and used without a table. This is what sets them apart from benchtop models.
After using the jigsaw on several projects I have to say it exceeds my expectations. I do not have a bandsaw and have used this jigsaw to process non-dimensioned stock then worked the material with hand planes into dimensional lumber. Most recently I found an 8/4 slab of cherry that was 10" wide and 9 feet long. Using this jigsaw and a guide I was able to bring the edges and ends into rough square then work the rest into full square with planes. My table saw is not safe with a long board such as this and this jigsaw left a reasonable cut with no danger of kickback.
Set the saw’s fence. Use the board you’re going to rip to set the fence. Hold the board against the fence and slide it until it makes contact with the jig. Set the fence so the board slides easily but without play between the jig and the fence. Make your cut and then reset the fence for the next cut. If you have a lot of stock to rip from several boards, it pays to rip all the boards to the same width first.
With the right tools and materials, what you build is only limited by your imagination and creativity. So why not have a little fun with the kids and teach them something at the same time? Our woodworker tools and woodworking supplies will help you put together an easy birdhouse, squirrel feeder or butterfly house. The kids will love to use our paint samples to add their creative touch, and will enjoy displaying the finished product in the backyard.
×