Hitachi is a well-known name in power tools, so we expected this saw to be a solid performer. To start, the 35-inch rip capacity is better than many competitors in the same price range. This one is priced right in the middle of the pack. With an included folding stand with wheels for easy transport, it seemed like this saw was going to be a winner!

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Although this saw doesn’t give us anything to harp on when it comes to operation, it has one massive design flaw that handicaps it. The motor is open to all of the sawdust you’re cutting. This causes the saw to have common longevity issues, dying short of the two-year mark. Despite the great functionality, it won’t be much use once the motor dies. For the high price, we’d hope for a great warranty to accompany this tool, but instead, we get a very mediocre one-year policy. When spending so much on a table saw, we think the better choice is to spend it wisely on a good long-term investment that will last for years of use.
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Cutting Fast: An obvious question when comparing the performance of different jigsaws is “which saw cuts the fastest?” I created a speed cutting test to determine the answer. First, I fitted each saw with a new Bosch Progressor blade, designed specifically for fast, rough cutting. With the help of my wife, Ann, I timed how long it took each saw to crosscut a 2x6, as shown in the lead photo on page 44. I took several passes, then averaged the times for each saw. I tried to push each saw as hard as I could without bogging its motor down. In the final tally, the premium-priced Festool turned in the fastest average time: 2.74 seconds, notable because this saw doesn’t have the highest-amperage motor or fastest blade stroke speed in this group of jigsaws. The next fastest cutting time was clocked by the Makita — less than a tenth of a second slower than the Festool. Posting a slightly slower time than that was the Bosch, followed (in timed order) by the Metabo, Milwaukee and Hitachi. The DeWALT held up the rear of the pack with a rather slow 4.27-second average time. The second-and-a-half difference between the fastest and slowest saws might not seem like much. But this time can really add up if you have dozens of rafter ends to decoratively jigsaw, or a pile of curved parts to cut out. Vibration: Regardless of how fast a jigsaw cuts, the less vibration it produces, the better. All jigsaws employ some sort of counterbalance system to reduce the up-and-down shaking created by the reciprocating plunger and blade, and some work better than others. In truth, I found it quite difficult to accurately compare the vibration of the various saws in the group, as it varied under different circumstances. For example, the DeWALT felt very smooth-running when idling at full speed. However, when I put the saw to wood, it produced noticeably more vibration. After careful consideration, I found the Bosch and Festool, closely followed by the Milwaukee and Makita, consistently produced the least vibration when cutting a variety of wood types and thicknesses with a variety of blades. That’s not to say that the DeWALT and Hitachi produce unacceptable amounts of vibration, but they just didn’t feel as smooth running as the top saws. At the bottom of the pack, the Metabo jigsaw consistently produced more vibration than any of the other saws. [caption id="attachment_7431" align="aligncenter" width="370"] One of the tests the author put the saws through was cutting melamine, which is fragile and likely to splinter when making close cuts. Cutting cleanly: Getting clean jigsaw cuts with only light splintering, tearout and surface chipping is chiefly a matter of selecting a blade that’s designed for the job. But I still wanted to see just how smooth a cut each saw was capable of producing with a general purpose blade. I fit each saw with a fine-toothed blade and set it to a medium speed with a slight orbit (#1). I then took several cuts with each on a piece of 3/4" melamine — a material notorious for chipping easily. After experimenting with different rates of feed, I selected the cutoffs that displayed the cleanest edge produced by each saw. The Bosch, aided, I suspect, by its precision control guide, left the cleanest cut edges. With cuts only slightly more ragged than the Bosch were the Makita, Festool and DeWALT, followed by the other saws. It’s worth noting that I was able to get a much cleaner cut with all of these saws by fitting them with a special saw blade designed for laminates, as well as an anti-splinter insert. [caption id="attachment_7432" align="aligncenter" width="305"] The better view you have of the cut line, the more accurate your cut will be, and the Bosch jigsaw has the best overall cutting viewpoint. Cutting accurately: The major factors that affect the accuracy of jigsaw cuts are: How well you can see the line of cut and how well the saw’s blade stays square to the workpiece (or at a fixed angle during bevel cuts). Generally, a saw with less of its body overhanging the blade is easier to use, especially when you’re working in cramped quarters or trying to follow a curvaceous line, say when cutting out a scrollwork pattern. The open front end configuration of the Bosch and Metabo make it much easier for me to see the blade without having to crane my neck. The Milwaukee and Hitachi have the most blade obscuring body overhangs, but the former’s built-in LED light helps to improve its line-of-cut visibility. [caption id="attachment_7433" align="aligncenter" width="470"] Many of the jigsaws had a slight waver in them, but the Bosch and Festool saws provided the most square cuts. It’s usually true that the thicker, denser (or more variable in density) a workpiece is, the more likely that a jigsaw’s blade will deflect when cutting it. This is especially true when cutting tight curves. To judge this aspect of cutting accuracy, I crosscut 4x4 lumber with each jigsaw. Most models left edges that wavered in squareness and up-and-down straightness over the length of the cut. The exceptions were the Bosch and Festool models, which left nearly dead square and straight cut edges. It’s safe to assume that such superior performance was likely due to the special blade guide systems on these saws, which helped prevent their long saw blades from deflecting.
The first jig crosscuts small parts without putting your fingers in harm’s way or sending little offcuts flying back into your face. The second jig allows you to repeatedly rip very thin stock without the risk of kickback. The third jig lets you safely crosscut panels for casework. And the fourth jig provides an easy, accurate way to cut tapered legs. All four jigs make use of the factory-milled miter slots found on contractor and cabinet saws. Once you have these jigs in your shop, you’ll be surprised how often you reach for them and what a difference they make in your saw’s capabilities.

Another jig that is widely available at woodworking suppliers is the featherboard or variations on the featherboard, designed to be used with a table saw or router table to hold the stock securely against the cutting head or blade. Not only does the featherboard hold the board securely, ensuring that cuts and beads are straight and true, but it serves as a safety mechanism to help prevent kickback.
If you’ve shopped online, you know you don’t always get the quality that you think you’re going to get. When making a big purchase like a table saw, you don’t want to make that mistake. If you need to get the most bang for your buck, then you’ve come to the right place. It’s not always obvious which features are important and which are not, but we’ve done the hard work for you.
Whether you’re a seasoned woodworker or DIY pro, you’ll find the woodworking tools you need for the jobsite or around the house. Search woodworking project plans to get some fresh ideas or browse our wide tool selection to find exactly what you need. Outfit your woodworking shop with routers, sanders, table saws, dust collectors, planing tools, and hand tools from bestselling brands including Makita, Festool, Bosch, JET, Powermatic, Rockler, Grizzly, and more.

Many DIY hobbyists may be attracted to the incredibly low price and small footprint of the Rockwell BladeRunner X2. At just under 15 pounds, it’s light and easily storable, thanks to its very small stature. The 3,000 RPM max speed isn’t anything great, but at this price, it’s hard to expect anything more. It’s packed with gimmicky features that just don’t work very well, such as the rip fence, miter gauge, and the vacuum port. They would be great, but they just don’t function as well as you’d hope. The three-year warranty is a pleasant surprise though.
Milwaukee is a well-trusted name in the world of power tools. This table saw is part of their cordless M18 Fuel system. It sits at the high end of the pricing spectrum, though it’s still a small, tabletop design. For this price, you would almost expect to see a stand of some sort, but not with the Milwaukee. You’re mostly paying for the portability of battery-power. Unfortunately, cordless has its own set of drawbacks. Despite the decent battery life, the power just isn’t quite enough for real job site use.
This Combination Machine is similar to the G0634Z This Combination Machine is similar to the G0634Z except it sports our popular Polar Bear colors. It also has an end-mounted fence so you can work as close to your shop wall as possible. This feature is a real space saver and since this is a combination machine you're saving ...  More + Product Details Close
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