Solid tool, works fantastic. Before buying my own I borrowed several jig saws at different times for projects. They were always "eh, it'll work". I'm glad I bought this for myself. Don't have to borrow anything and this jigsaw is vastly superior to the ones I was borrowed. Cuts straight, easier to change the blade, more power behind you (looks cool too) and comes with a nice case to boot.
Wood routers come in many different sizes and matching the right size router to the job at hand will help you produce better results. If you will mostly be using your router to soften edges and create small profile areas out of a workpiece, than a compact trim router with a 1 to 1.5 HP engine is your best bet. Their small size allows them to easily be used in a variety of orientations and in compact areas where using a larger router would be problematic.
You’ll also want to make sure that you’re getting a model that doesn’t have a problem with internal dust collection. Some don’t do a great job of funneling the dust towards the port, so it ends up sitting inside the unit. This can affect performance, as sawdust is great at gumming up moving parts. So, if you get one of those models, know that you’re going to have to regularly open it up and clean it out to keep it in tip-top shape, which is a pain, but necessary if you want your unit to last a long time.

This is the third box joint jig I have purchased and I wish I had of bought this one first instead of trying cheaper alternatives that didn't work out. Once you put this tool together, it's a snap to use. One test cut using the dado blade of choice (won't work with a wobble dado) is all that's needed. Once you zero the tool to your dado blade edge, an extremely clever dual lead screw internal to the tool simultaneously sets the pin and slot spacing without any additional adjustments. It's beautiful American made ingenuity that I am delighted to own. The construction of the tool is simply first class. I have no doubt it will last me forever. The parts that get chewed up (backing plate etc.) are easy to create duplicates out of shop scraps. An excellent video came with ... full review
This is a great jigsaw, perfect for our home projects. My husband and I are always fixing, building, creating or improving something and this has been dependable and handy. It works great, easy to handle and maneuver. I’ve never used power tools myself but my husband showed me how to use this and I’m loving it. The laser guide and the straight edge attachment are the features we most like. Came complete with different size spare blades, case, attachments, and instructions. It’s exactly what we needed and wanted!
Milwaukee is a well-trusted name in the world of power tools. This table saw is part of their cordless M18 Fuel system. It sits at the high end of the pricing spectrum, though it’s still a small, tabletop design. For this price, you would almost expect to see a stand of some sort, but not with the Milwaukee. You’re mostly paying for the portability of battery-power. Unfortunately, cordless has its own set of drawbacks. Despite the decent battery life, the power just isn’t quite enough for real job site use. 

I’ve conducted dozens and dozens of tool reviews in my career, but few were as close as this one: After a couple of weeks of testing and hundreds of cuts, I found a small range of differences between my most and least favorite saws. All seven are truly top quality tools capable of putting in a serious day’s work. Even the relatively bargain-priced Hitachi is a well-built machine that deserves a place in this lineup. But as capable as these machines are, some models proved to be better performers and more “user-friendly” than others. The three factors that were the most important to me when choosing the best jigsaws included: 1. Solid performance — a blend of aggressive cutting and smooth operation 2. Superior user comfort — a comfy grip and easy to use controls 3. Good value for the money — the balance of features and price. When I considered the saws independent of price, there was a fairly small point spread between the top models, with the Bosch, Makita and Festool leading the pack. It was a bit easier to choose an alpha saw when price entered the picture. As good as the top-priced Festool Trion proved to be, I don’t think it’s twice as good as the Makita that’s half the price. The Makita 4350 FCT is a very good jigsaw for the price, but the Bosch had a better feature set and overall performance for just under $50 more. Therefore, the Bosch 1590 EVSL earns my choice as the “Best Bet” in this group of impressive top-shelf jigsaws.
This is the third box joint jig I have purchased and I wish I had of bought this one first instead of trying cheaper alternatives that didn't work out. Once you put this tool together, it's a snap to use. One test cut using the dado blade of choice (won't work with a wobble dado) is all that's needed. Once you zero the tool to your dado blade edge, an extremely clever dual lead screw internal to the tool simultaneously sets the pin and slot spacing without any additional adjustments. It's beautiful American made ingenuity that I am delighted to own. The construction of the tool is simply first class. I have no doubt it will last me forever. The parts that get chewed up (backing plate etc.) are easy to create duplicates out of shop scraps. An excellent video came with ... full review
We started making cuts and the only complaint was the fence not staying put. This saw was on track to rank high up on this list. Until day two, when the motor suddenly died for no apparent reason. We checked everything but couldn’t determine a cause. Luckily, it’s covered under Hitachi’s five-year warranty. After doing some research though, this problem is a pretty common occurrence. Despite the great operation and feature set, the lack of reliability means we can’t recommend this saw as a top performer.
Woodworking expert Sandor Nagyszalanczy tested the best jigsaws on the market to determine what features worked well in the shop and which was best overall. I’ve always thought of a jigsaw as a sort of “poor man’s band saw.” During my early woodworking days when I lacked both the funds and space for a band saw, I used the best jigsaw I could find (I borrowed money from a friend to buy it). I used that jigsaw for all my curve cutting tasks, as well as the jobs a band saw couldn’t do: pocket cuts, inside circular cutouts, and all manner of trimming inside built-in cabinets and furniture. Nearly 35 years later, when it came time to pick a batch of jigsaws to review for Woodoworker's Journal, I was anxious to try out the “top-shelf” models offered by the best known power tool manufacturers. These include the best offerings from Bosch, DeWALT, Festool, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo and Milwaukee. The Porter-Cable 9543 was slated to be part of this group, but was, unfortunately, recently discontinued. I also tried to include a jigsaw made by the Swiss power tool company Hilti, but they chose not to participate in the article. Instead of discussing each saw individually, I will compare all of their attributes and cutting abilities in two sections: The first contrasts the features and accessories of the seven models. The second section describes the performance tests I put each jigsaw through and reports on how well each model fared.

We offer the best hand saws for woodworking. A fine hand saw's image has long been the emblem of a craftsman at work. Used for carpentry, dovetailing, joinery and many other tasks around the shop, we stock a large variety of hand saws. You will find the hand saw you need among our selection of British Bowsaws, Gent's Saws and Tenon Saws, our extensive collection of Japanese Hand Saws, and the fine hand saws of Lie Nielsen. Be sure to check out the newest additions to our Backsaw collection from Bad Axe Tool Works - the ultimate in premium hand saws, made in the USA. Selecting the best hand saws for woodworking can be daunting, to help sort through all the options we recommend reading Essential Woodworking Hand Tools by Author Paul Sellers. His book includes a lengthy chapter on hand saws to help you decide which hand saws you need in your workshop.
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