I’ve conducted dozens and dozens of tool reviews in my career, but few were as close as this one: After a couple of weeks of testing and hundreds of cuts, I found a small range of differences between my most and least favorite saws. All seven are truly top quality tools capable of putting in a serious day’s work. Even the relatively bargain-priced Hitachi is a well-built machine that deserves a place in this lineup. But as capable as these machines are, some models proved to be better performers and more “user-friendly” than others. The three factors that were the most important to me when choosing the best jigsaws included: 1. Solid performance — a blend of aggressive cutting and smooth operation 2. Superior user comfort — a comfy grip and easy to use controls 3. Good value for the money — the balance of features and price. When I considered the saws independent of price, there was a fairly small point spread between the top models, with the Bosch, Makita and Festool leading the pack. It was a bit easier to choose an alpha saw when price entered the picture. As good as the top-priced Festool Trion proved to be, I don’t think it’s twice as good as the Makita that’s half the price. The Makita 4350 FCT is a very good jigsaw for the price, but the Bosch had a better feature set and overall performance for just under $50 more. Therefore, the Bosch 1590 EVSL earns my choice as the “Best Bet” in this group of impressive top-shelf jigsaws.
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The last tool I recommend for every beginning woodworker is a quality router. While many routers available today offer two different bases (a stationary base and a plunge router base), for most beginners, a quality stationary base model will take care of quite a number of tasks, and can also be mounted in a router table should you choose to invest in (or even build one) one down the line. Choose a router model that is at least 2-HP and has electronic variable speed controls (as larger cutting bits should use slower speeds), a soft start mechanism and is easy to make bit changes (preferably with the ability to use both 1/2-inch and 1/4-inch shank router bits).
Routers with engines in the 1.75 to 2.25 HP range would be considered mid-sized routers. These may come with a plunge or fixed base and require both hands during operation. Mid-sized routers are a good compromise between convenience and power. They can accomplish jobs that would unfeasible with trim routers, and jobs where a full-sized router would be too unwieldy.

I agree, that’s a nice and easy set up to start with. I’d say a block plane it’s handy for small areas, and touch ups. A no.5 is excellent but a bit heavy and tiring sometimes. I find that a nice rabbet block plane (shoulder + block) with two irons with different sharpening angles it’s essential to me. One fine flat rasp and a medium flat file would complete my set.
Contractor: Slightly larger saws that have an open stand and a larger motor that is connected to the arbor with a belt-drive system. These motors, typically 1-1/2 to 2 hp, tend to deliver more power and run quieter, as well. Cut capacity also tends to be greater on contractor saws than on portable saws. They usually can be plugged in to standard 110-volt residential outlets.
A few initial notes are in order. If buying a contractor saw, I would consider Delta and Jet offerings by that same name. If my work and budget called for a cabinet saw, I would consider the Jet Xacta, Powermatic 66, and Delta Unisaw. Test-drive candidate saws; a few cuts mean more than a month of junk mail. Durability and fence quality are generally not factors. Either saw type will last outlast its owner with reasonable care, and either can be bought with a high quality fence. I would not consider anything less than the contractor saws mentioned above. Cheaper saws make rough cuts, wear out quickly, don't hold their adjustments, and are more prone to dangerous kickbacks. The good taste of money saved turns bitter when your projects take longer and turn out poorly. My intent is to state differences in a non-biased manner, but an attempt has been made to order the items by probable importance.
The Makita 1/4 in. Laminate Trimmer combines power The Makita 1/4 in. Laminate Trimmer combines power and speed with precise control for smooth trimming and routing applications. It is engineered for woodworkers finish carpenters and general contractors seeking a best-in-class laminate trimmer. The Laminate Trimmer features a 4 Amp motor with 30 000 RPM ideal for smooth trimming ...  More + Product Details Close
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