Karen Bennett lives in Chicago with her family, and when she’s not writing, she can usually be found practicing yoga or cheering on her kids at soccer games. She holds a master’s.degree in journalism and a bachelor’s in English, and her writing has been published in various local newspapers, as well as “The Cheat Sheet,” “Illinois Legal Times,” and “USA Today.” She has also written search engine news page headlines and worked as a product manager for a digital marketing company. Her expertise is in literature, nonfiction, textbooks, home products, kids' games and toys, hardware, teaching accessories, and art materials.
Solid tool, works fantastic. Before buying my own I borrowed several jig saws at different times for projects. They were always "eh, it'll work". I'm glad I bought this for myself. Don't have to borrow anything and this jigsaw is vastly superior to the ones I was borrowed. Cuts straight, easier to change the blade, more power behind you (looks cool too) and comes with a nice case to boot.
We started making cuts and the only complaint was the fence not staying put. This saw was on track to rank high up on this list. Until day two, when the motor suddenly died for no apparent reason. We checked everything but couldn’t determine a cause. Luckily, it’s covered under Hitachi’s five-year warranty. After doing some research though, this problem is a pretty common occurrence. Despite the great operation and feature set, the lack of reliability means we can’t recommend this saw as a top performer.
Woodworking expert Sandor Nagyszalanczy tested the best jigsaws on the market to determine what features worked well in the shop and which was best overall. I’ve always thought of a jigsaw as a sort of “poor man’s band saw.” During my early woodworking days when I lacked both the funds and space for a band saw, I used the best jigsaw I could find (I borrowed money from a friend to buy it). I used that jigsaw for all my curve cutting tasks, as well as the jobs a band saw couldn’t do: pocket cuts, inside circular cutouts, and all manner of trimming inside built-in cabinets and furniture. Nearly 35 years later, when it came time to pick a batch of jigsaws to review for Woodoworker's Journal, I was anxious to try out the “top-shelf” models offered by the best known power tool manufacturers. These include the best offerings from Bosch, DeWALT, Festool, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo and Milwaukee. The Porter-Cable 9543 was slated to be part of this group, but was, unfortunately, recently discontinued. I also tried to include a jigsaw made by the Swiss power tool company Hilti, but they chose not to participate in the article. Instead of discussing each saw individually, I will compare all of their attributes and cutting abilities in two sections: The first contrasts the features and accessories of the seven models. The second section describes the performance tests I put each jigsaw through and reports on how well each model fared.

Milwaukee is a well-trusted name in the world of power tools. This table saw is part of their cordless M18 Fuel system. It sits at the high end of the pricing spectrum, though it’s still a small, tabletop design. For this price, you would almost expect to see a stand of some sort, but not with the Milwaukee. You’re mostly paying for the portability of battery-power. Unfortunately, cordless has its own set of drawbacks. Despite the decent battery life, the power just isn’t quite enough for real job site use.


The Makita 1/4 in. Laminate Trimmer combines power The Makita 1/4 in. Laminate Trimmer combines power and speed with precise control for smooth trimming and routing applications. It is engineered for woodworkers finish carpenters and general contractors seeking a best-in-class laminate trimmer. The Laminate Trimmer features a 4 Amp motor with 30 000 RPM ideal for smooth trimming ...  More + Product Details Close
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