There is a BIG difference in a cheap jigsaw and one that costs a bit more. Seriously, a BIG difference. I hated using my old jigsaw ($35 dollar hardware store special.) This one is awesome. Glides through plywood. Has several settings that actually make a difference in how it cuts. If you are on the fence about buying a more expensive jigsaw, do it. There really is that big of a difference.
Cabinet table saws are not portable. They’re instead designed for use by professional woodworkers. That means that they’re designed to have a lot of power and to stand up to constant daily use. They have more steel and cast iron in their bodies to increase their durability, which also means that they tend to be lower-vibration than other units, which leads to cleaner cuts.
If you’re not sure how to proceed, it’s important to take a breath and think about what you need out of a table saw. You could get a model with every possible bell and whistle, but there’s there no reason to do that if you’re not going to use it frequently. Likewise, you could just buy the cheapest model, but that doesn’t mean it’s going to be a fun machine to use.
These models tend to be much heavier than portable models, clocking in at 200+ pounds in many circumstances, which mean you may need another person in order to move them safely. The big upside to this model is that that additional weight goes to good use. They tend to have much larger rip capacities, and the table top tends to be more durable and stable than the expanding systems used in portable models.

Many beginners trying to get started in woodworking take one look at their budget and worry about how they can afford to buy a whole shop full of power tools to get started. Fortunately, one doesn't have to spend a fortune to get started. There are really only seven woodworking tools that I would recommend any beginning woodworker have on hand from the start, and most are relatively inexpensive. However, with these seven tools, a beginner can tackle quite a number of projects.
My Stanley 51/2 was in a bit of a state when I got it and refurbing it took a bit of time and cash. Now it works a treat and looks like new. I’m nearly through the bench build and have spend hours using it – it really is a workhorse piece of kit. I did some final cleaning up of some oak legs the other day and I can’t really see how a smaller plain would do a better job.

Many DIY hobbyists may be attracted to the incredibly low price and small footprint of the Rockwell BladeRunner X2. At just under 15 pounds, it’s light and easily storable, thanks to its very small stature. The 3,000 RPM max speed isn’t anything great, but at this price, it’s hard to expect anything more. It’s packed with gimmicky features that just don’t work very well, such as the rip fence, miter gauge, and the vacuum port. They would be great, but they just don’t function as well as you’d hope. The three-year warranty is a pleasant surprise though.
This is the third box joint jig I have purchased and I wish I had of bought this one first instead of trying cheaper alternatives that didn't work out. Once you put this tool together, it's a snap to use. One test cut using the dado blade of choice (won't work with a wobble dado) is all that's needed. Once you zero the tool to your dado blade edge, an extremely clever dual lead screw internal to the tool simultaneously sets the pin and slot spacing without any additional adjustments. It's beautiful American made ingenuity that I am delighted to own. The construction of the tool is simply first class. I have no doubt it will last me forever. The parts that get chewed up (backing plate etc.) are easy to create duplicates out of shop scraps. An excellent video came with ... full review
My Stanley 51/2 was in a bit of a state when I got it and refurbing it took a bit of time and cash. Now it works a treat and looks like new. I’m nearly through the bench build and have spend hours using it – it really is a workhorse piece of kit. I did some final cleaning up of some oak legs the other day and I can’t really see how a smaller plain would do a better job.
There are a few features that every good router should have which make jobs easier and allow for more precise work. The first feature to look for is variable speed controls. Different bit sizes work best at different speeds. For example large bits should rotate at lower speeds, while smaller bits should rotate at higher speeds. The ability to adjust the size can be of vital importance.
While some people consider the circular saw to be more of a carpentry tool than a fine woodworking tool, but some would disagree. There may be no more versatile basic handheld power tool than a circular saw. When used with a clamp-on straight-edge, the circular saw can be just about as accurate as a table saw and handle quite a few of the tasks that one would attempt with a table saw, particularly cutting sheet goods such as plywood or medium-density fiberboard. When woodworking on a budget, a quality circular saw should be the first handheld power tool purchased, as it is the one that will likely be the most useful as you get started.
There are a few features that every good router should have which make jobs easier and allow for more precise work. The first feature to look for is variable speed controls. Different bit sizes work best at different speeds. For example large bits should rotate at lower speeds, while smaller bits should rotate at higher speeds. The ability to adjust the size can be of vital importance.
In most situations, you can take the dust bag off of the port and hook up a shop vac or an industrial dust-collection system. Many table saws make use of a standard-size dust port between 2-1/2 and 4 inches in diameter, which means it may be compatible with equipment that you already own. Some models forgo the dust bag altogether, in the expectation that you’ll be using some sort of dust collection system.
Do you get what you pay for? Well, to be fair, this is a very nice saw for what it is. We don’t think its feature list warrants the extravagant price tag, but it’s a very solid build. The fence is a real highpoint as it locks in place well and stays straight. The blade can reach 6,300 RPM, which is surprising for a battery-powered saw. The arms extend for a 24.5-inch rip capacity, which is a very handy feature.
For woodworking entertainment and inspiration be sure to checkout our Woodworking Video Series "The Highland Woodworker". Improve your woodworking skills and learn more about the use of woodworking tools with free online woodworking materials in the Woodworking Library. At Highland Woodworking you get more than fine woodworking tools...you get fine tool tips too!
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