Someone on here made the point that it took them a few years before they got a clear idea about what they wanted to make. I can relate to that. I’m starting to think that I’d like to do a cabinet type build so maybe a plough plane would help with that. There are plenty of old Stanley’s knocking around on Ebay. On the other hand, I’m in no hurry to buy anything else – I feel much more inclined now to make do and explore the limitations of tools that I’ve got.
Many beginners trying to get started in woodworking take one look at their budget and worry about how they can afford to buy a whole shop full of power tools to get started. Fortunately, one doesn't have to spend a fortune to get started. There are really only seven woodworking tools that I would recommend any beginning woodworker have on hand from the start, and most are relatively inexpensive. However, with these seven tools, a beginner can tackle quite a number of projects.

The JET JDP-17MF Floor Drill Press is a The JET JDP-17MF Floor Drill Press is a true woodworker's drill press. With 16-speeds it lets you choose the best speed for the job. It comes equipped with a quick release crank operated worktable; work light X-pattern mounting grooves depth stop and adjustable tension spindle return spring which is ideal ...  More + Product Details Close


The JET JDP-17MF Floor Drill Press is a The JET JDP-17MF Floor Drill Press is a true woodworker's drill press. With 16-speeds it lets you choose the best speed for the job. It comes equipped with a quick release crank operated worktable; work light X-pattern mounting grooves depth stop and adjustable tension spindle return spring which is ideal ...  More + Product Details Close
I am not a power tool guy. My only power tools before this had been a hand-held drill (from 1980) and a hand sander. But I needed to put two cat doors in our house and needed something to cut the openings in our solid-wood doors. The same day that this saw arrived on the front porch, I managed to cut openings in two doors with no issues. (Well, no issues with the saw, anyway. Given my limited power-tool skills, I ended up adhering to the "Measure once, cut twice" rule. But that's my shortcoming, not the saw's.)
The first jig crosscuts small parts without putting your fingers in harm’s way or sending little offcuts flying back into your face. The second jig allows you to repeatedly rip very thin stock without the risk of kickback. The third jig lets you safely crosscut panels for casework. And the fourth jig provides an easy, accurate way to cut tapered legs. All four jigs make use of the factory-milled miter slots found on contractor and cabinet saws. Once you have these jigs in your shop, you’ll be surprised how often you reach for them and what a difference they make in your saw’s capabilities.
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