Consequently, they’re going to be a bit heavier than benchtop models. However, their expanding frames mean that you’ll be able to use them even in places where you don’t have access to a table or bench. This is great for construction work, or situations where you’re going to be working outside. This type tends to be a little bit bigger than the benchtop variety, and often has more rip capacity as well.

For very many years (since the early 70’s) I built furniture, that I still have and use, with a Stanley No4 as my one and only plane – and only one blade for it. I still have, and use, that same plane. I now have other planes, but the first one is still my ‘go to’ plane. I have just given away my set of chisels, to my son, as I have collected a few old wooden handled ones which I now prefer, but those old blue plastic Marples set did me well for about 25 years.
Many DIY hobbyists may be attracted to the incredibly low price and small footprint of the Rockwell BladeRunner X2. At just under 15 pounds, it’s light and easily storable, thanks to its very small stature. The 3,000 RPM max speed isn’t anything great, but at this price, it’s hard to expect anything more. It’s packed with gimmicky features that just don’t work very well, such as the rip fence, miter gauge, and the vacuum port. They would be great, but they just don’t function as well as you’d hope. The three-year warranty is a pleasant surprise though.
After you have chosen the perfect table saw for your woodshop, the next major purchase one should consider would be a compound miter saw. While not as expensive as a quality table saw, a compound miter saw is invaluable for cutting compound angles (beveled, mitered and combination cuts) on the ends of a piece of stock. Once you develop your ability to make precise cuts with a compound miter saw, you'll find that your circular saw spends a little more time in the drawer than it used to.

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While some people consider the circular saw to be more of a carpentry tool than a fine woodworking tool, but some would disagree. There may be no more versatile basic handheld power tool than a circular saw. When used with a clamp-on straight-edge, the circular saw can be just about as accurate as a table saw and handle quite a few of the tasks that one would attempt with a table saw, particularly cutting sheet goods such as plywood or medium-density fiberboard. When woodworking on a budget, a quality circular saw should be the first handheld power tool purchased, as it is the one that will likely be the most useful as you get started.

A few initial notes are in order. If buying a contractor saw, I would consider Delta and Jet offerings by that same name. If my work and budget called for a cabinet saw, I would consider the Jet Xacta, Powermatic 66, and Delta Unisaw. Test-drive candidate saws; a few cuts mean more than a month of junk mail. Durability and fence quality are generally not factors. Either saw type will last outlast its owner with reasonable care, and either can be bought with a high quality fence. I would not consider anything less than the contractor saws mentioned above. Cheaper saws make rough cuts, wear out quickly, don't hold their adjustments, and are more prone to dangerous kickbacks. The good taste of money saved turns bitter when your projects take longer and turn out poorly. My intent is to state differences in a non-biased manner, but an attempt has been made to order the items by probable importance.


Although this saw doesn’t give us anything to harp on when it comes to operation, it has one massive design flaw that handicaps it. The motor is open to all of the sawdust you’re cutting. This causes the saw to have common longevity issues, dying short of the two-year mark. Despite the great functionality, it won’t be much use once the motor dies. For the high price, we’d hope for a great warranty to accompany this tool, but instead, we get a very mediocre one-year policy. When spending so much on a table saw, we think the better choice is to spend it wisely on a good long-term investment that will last for years of use.
[caption id="attachment_7419" align="aligncenter" width="405"] The author prefers a longer handled jigsaw, as it allows you to grip it at different angles more easily for different cuts. Handle & trigger: A good handle is important on a jigsaw for user comfort and also because a solid grip is essential to controlling the movement of the tool during cutting. All of the saws in this group, save the Festool, have a rubber-like overmold covering their handles. Overmolds are softer to the touch than hard plastic, provide a more secure grip and even dampen tool vibration slightly. Of the seven saws, the handles on the Makita and Hitachi fit my medium-sized hands the best. I also liked the longer handles found on these saws (as well as several others) because their length allows for a varied grip to suit different working positions. The pommel at the front of the DeWALT’s handle allows a two-handed grip — helpful when cutting in awkward positions. [caption id="attachment_7420" align="aligncenter" width="405"] Wider triggers offer you more gripping options and control, whereas narrower jigsaw triggers can be clumsy and hard to grip while cutting. A jigsaw’s most important operational feature is its trigger that switches the tool on and off. I generally prefer a wider tool trigger that allows twofinger operation, to help reduce hand fatigue. Wide triggers also let users place their hands in a variety of positions along the tool’s handle. The Festool was the only saw in the group with a narrow trigger, and I didn’t like its stiff, clunky on/off action. I preferred the comfortable, smooth-operating, wide triggers on the DeWALT and Makita. All the saws have trigger locks, so you don’t have to hold the trigger on during long cuts. The Bosch’s trigger lock is the only one designed for use by left- or right-hand users. The Bosch, DeWALT and Milwaukee saws feature variable triggers that let you ramp up the speed of the blade gradually, up to the maximum set on its variable-speed dial. This is useful when starting cuts in very hard and/or splintery woods as well as materials prone to chipping, like tile and plastics. The Bosch’s unique trigger works with a two-step action: Pull the trigger lightly, and the saw immediately switches on to a slow speed. Press the trigger a little farther and it fully varies the speed up to the set maximum. Although the Bosch’s trigger works well enough, I prefer the triggers on the DeWALT and Milwaukee, which let you ramp the speed up from zero to the maximum set speed with one continuous pull. [caption id="attachment_7421" align="aligncenter" width="480"] All the portable jigsaws had variable speed control dials, but the locations varied, with some being harder to reach while operating than others. Variable-speed & soft start: All seven saws are variable-speed models with dials that allow you to set the motor speed and, hence, the number of blade strokes per minute. This makes a jigsaw a more versatile cutting machine: Choose slower speeds for fine cuts and when cutting dense materials and plastics and faster speeds for quicker, rougher cuts in lighter woods and porous materials. Interestingly, the saws with the highest maximum speeds didn’t necessarily cut faster than those with slower speeds. I like the position of the speed dials on the Hitachi and Festool saws. These are easier to see and set than the rear-mounted dials on the Bosch, Metabo and Makita. The DeWALT and Milwaukee have trigger-mounted speed dials that I find hard to see and set without tipping or inverting the saw. The Metabo and Makita both feature “soft-start” motor electronics that ramp up motor speed gradually when the tool’s trigger is pulled. Soft start can prevent the saw from suddenly jerking if you start cutting with the blade in contact with the material. But, overall, I found soft start more of an irritation than an aid; I didn’t like having to wait for the saw to come up to speed each time I started a cut. [caption id="attachment_7422" align="aligncenter" width="495"] One of the things to check when selecting a jigsaw is how comfortable the orbital blade adjustment is, as this will ultimately guide how aggressive your cuts can be. Selectable blade orbit: Probably the single most important feature on a topnotch jigsaw is its orbital blade action. This mechanism moves the blade forward slightly during the upstroke cut, resulting in a more aggressive cutting action than if the blade simply reciprocated up and down. The mechanism also moves the saw blade back slightly, so it clears the kerf during the return down stroke and saves wear on the teeth. Adjusting the amount of blade orbit makes the saw cut more or less aggressively. Most saws have four orbit settings: 0 (no orbit) or 1 for cutting metals and plastics; 1 or 2 for fine and curved cuts; and 3 (maximum orbit) for faster, rougher cuts. The Metabo features five orbit selections instead of four, but I didn’t find the greater range of select ability to be particularly necessary or useful. The Milwaukee has a small, somewhat handy blade orbit and speed selection chart mounted on the side of the tool. [caption id="attachment_7423" align="aligncenter" width="465"] While they are historically a bandsaw accessory, blade guides are starting to make their way onto jigsaws like these from Festool and Bosch. Blade guide systems: A unique feature found on the Festool and Bosch saws is a special saw blade guide positioned below the orbit mechanism’s guide wheel. These small metal guides work like the guide blocks on a band saw, to help stabilize the blade and keep it from deflecting during cutting. The Festool’s guide has two small prongs that contact the blade more closely at the back than at the front. They’re user-adjustable via an included Allen wrench. The Bosch’s “Precision Guide Control” has two small parallel blocks that are user-engaged via a small pushbutton. The blocks apply light spring-loaded pressure against the sides of the blade. The guide’s jaws open automatically when the blade release lever is pulled. Both of these innovative systems are very easy to use and significantly improve performance. [caption id="attachment_7424" align="aligncenter" width="475"] All the jigsaws featured had tool-free blade change systems, which allow you to safely and easily change out blades thanks to a spring loaded lever and clamp. Tool-less blade clamps: All seven jigsaws allow tool-less blade changes, employing a lever that opens the blade clamp on the end of the saw’s plunger — the part that moves the blade up and down. Tool-less blade clamps make changing the tang-style saw blades each model uses quick and easy. But each clamp is different, and some are easier to work with than on others. The Festool, Makita and Bosch blade clamps are among my favorites. The Festool’s “Fast Fix” blade change mechanism has a relatively stiff lever, but its clamp accepts blades without fuss and holds them rock solid. The Makita also has a terrific mechanism with a spring-loaded lever that’s easy to pull open and a clamp that accepts blades easily and positively. As good as these clamps are, the Bosch’s “One Touch” blade change system is my favorite. There’s no clunky mechanism or oversized blade clamp on the end of the plunger, just a simple slot. After pulling back the small, easy-to-use release lever, a spring gently ejects the blade. This can save you from burning your fingers trying to pull a hot blade out of the clamp after a prolonged cutting session. The new blade inserts easily into the Bosch’s plunger slot and latches with a positive feel. [caption id="attachment_7425" align="aligncenter" width="475"] Some jigsaws allow you to change the positioning of the footplate without tools, but most require the use of an Allen wrench which takes time, but isn't a deal breaker. Tilting footplate: Adjusting the angle of a jigsaw’s footplate (a.k.a. “shoe”) allows the saw to make bevel cuts, say for the edge of a picture frame or decorative plaque. While all these jigsaws have tilting footplates, only the Bosch, Milwaukee and DeWALT allow tool-less angle changes. Each of these saws has a lever that releases and locks the footplate easily and quickly. The Bosch’s even includes a separate dial for adjusting locking tightness. I like the Milwaukee’s wide lever the best because it operates smoothly and positively. The other four saws employ an Allen wrench, which conveniently stores on board the tool, for angle changes. Yes, using a wrench does take more time, but then again, how often does the average woodworker take bevel cuts with a jigsaw? Angle detents are very useful for locking in commonly used tilt settings. All the saws have a 0-degree detent for square cuts, and most have detents at 45 degrees and other angles as well. After checking the accuracy of the all-important 90-degree detents, I found that only the Festool and Bosch consistently kept their blades at near perfect square to the footplate. The other saws required a bit of fussing with a try square to get their blades dead on 90 degrees. [caption id="attachment_7426" align="aligncenter" width="475"] Fittings for easy chip extraction is handy, but sadly only comes with more expensive jigsaws from Metabo, Bosch and Festool Dust collection and sawdust blower: Having written many articles and several books on woodshop dust control, I’m a huge advocate of built-in dust collection on portable power tools. The three most expensive jigsaws in this group — the Festool, Bosch and Metabo — come with a chip extractor fitting for dust collection; it’s an optional accessory for the other four saws. This plastic fitting clips into the back of the saw’s footplate and connects to a small diameter vacuum hose (the Bosch comes with a hose adapter). A clear plastic chip guard snaps in place over the front of the saw to enclose the blade area and enhance chip collection. The guard must be removed for blade changes. I only tested dust collection with the three saws that came standard with the extractor fitting. Both the Bosch and Festool collected chips effectively, but there was a problem: Their chip guards limited the visibility of the line of cut, and as fine dust built up on the inside of the guard, it became nearly impossible to see. Visibility was considerably better with the Metabo when using dust collection, as its chip guard is much taller and larger and didn’t seem to attract as much fine dust. [caption id="attachment_7427" align="aligncenter" width="455"] Bosch's solution to not having dust collector fittings is a directed blower, which can be controlled via a switch on the side of the tool. An alternative means of clearing sawdust from the line of cut is to simply blow it away. All the saws feature a dust blower that uses air channeled from the motor fan to blow dust away from just in front of the blade. The blowers on all the saws do a pretty good job, save the Makita, whose airflow is rather sluggish. The Bosch has a blower On/Off lever, and the DeWALT and Milwaukee have controls for reducing the amount of blown air. Shutting off or turning down the airflow is desirable when you’re working inside your home and don’t want to launch sawdust everywhere, or when blown dust might end up in your eyes, say when jigsawing plumbing and electrical cutouts inside a kitchen cabinet. [caption id="attachment_7428" align="aligncenter" width="455"]Curiously, only the three least expensive saws tested, like this one from Hitachi, were equipped with an LED guide light. Built-in light: The Hitachi, Makita and Milwaukee all include one of my favorite portable power tool features: a built-in LED light. Interestingly, these are the three lowest-priced saws in the group (I guess toolmakers figure that the folks that buy more expensive saws also have better eyesight!). A built-in light is particularly welcome on a jigsaw, since the overhanging body tends to cast a shadow in the area of the blade. The Hitachi’s light has a small plastic pointer that conducts some of the LED’s light and sticks down in front of the blade. Although its goal is to better visually define the line of cut, I found it actually obscured the work area. [caption id="attachment_7429" align="aligncenter" width="495"] DeWalt jigsaws (amongst others) come with a removable footplate cover that is made of plastic to prevent the metal plate from scraping the wood. Other features: An accessory plastic shoe cover comes with the Bosch, Makita, Milwaukee and DeWALT jigsaws. This thin, slick plastic cover snaps in place over the tool’s footplate, allowing you to saw delicate materials — decorative veneers, plastics, Corian® countertops — without fear of causing scratches. The Festool doesn’t include a shoe cover, but it doesn’t really need one. Its cast alloy footplate already has a slick plastic covering. [caption id="attachment_7430" align="aligncenter" width="445"] Almost all jigsaws currently available come with a small, plastic anti-splitter insert that is very useful when cutting chipping prone materials like plywood. All the jigsaws in the group, except the Hitachi, come with a plastic anti-splinter insert. This small accessory snaps into its footplate to surround the area directly around the blade, like a zero-clearance throat plate in a table saw. These inserts really do help reduce splintering, and I recommend using them when taking fine cuts on splinter-prone woods and plywoods, as well as materials with delicate surfaces, such as melamine. Except for the economy-priced Hitachi, all the jigsaws in the group come with a plastic tool case. The Bosch and Festool saws have special stackable cases, each part of a system that allows multiple cases to be latched together for storage or transport. Like all other current Festool portable power tools, the Trion jigsaw features a detachable “Plug It” power cord. This makes it easier to stow, as you don’t have to wrap the cord around the tool. Plus, you can easily replace a damaged cord by simply plugging in a new one. The back of the Hitachi’s body has a loop molded in, making it easy to connect the tool to a lanyard or other hook — a nice feature if you work on a roof or ladder.
Solid tool, works fantastic. Before buying my own I borrowed several jig saws at different times for projects. They were always "eh, it'll work". I'm glad I bought this for myself. Don't have to borrow anything and this jigsaw is vastly superior to the ones I was borrowed. Cuts straight, easier to change the blade, more power behind you (looks cool too) and comes with a nice case to boot.
Cabinet table saws are not portable. They’re instead designed for use by professional woodworkers. That means that they’re designed to have a lot of power and to stand up to constant daily use. They have more steel and cast iron in their bodies to increase their durability, which also means that they tend to be lower-vibration than other units, which leads to cleaner cuts.
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