After you have chosen the perfect table saw for your woodshop, the next major purchase one should consider would be a compound miter saw. While not as expensive as a quality table saw, a compound miter saw is invaluable for cutting compound angles (beveled, mitered and combination cuts) on the ends of a piece of stock. Once you develop your ability to make precise cuts with a compound miter saw, you'll find that your circular saw spends a little more time in the drawer than it used to.


Another jig that is widely available at woodworking suppliers is the featherboard or variations on the featherboard, designed to be used with a table saw or router table to hold the stock securely against the cutting head or blade. Not only does the featherboard hold the board securely, ensuring that cuts and beads are straight and true, but it serves as a safety mechanism to help prevent kickback.
Another jig that is widely available at woodworking suppliers is the featherboard or variations on the featherboard, designed to be used with a table saw or router table to hold the stock securely against the cutting head or blade. Not only does the featherboard hold the board securely, ensuring that cuts and beads are straight and true, but it serves as a safety mechanism to help prevent kickback.
Plunge-base options have a motor that is mounted between spring-loaded posts, and handles located high up on the machine. They allow you to quickly vary cutting depth without having to turn off the tool and feature a depth stop. Fixed-base routers have a lower center of gravity with handles located near the bottom. They only allow routing from the side and cannot be plunged directly into the workpiece. They also require one to turn of the tool to adjust the cutting depth, but many find them easier to work with.
Woodworking expert Sandor Nagyszalanczy tested the best jigsaws on the market to determine what features worked well in the shop and which was best overall. I’ve always thought of a jigsaw as a sort of “poor man’s band saw.” During my early woodworking days when I lacked both the funds and space for a band saw, I used the best jigsaw I could find (I borrowed money from a friend to buy it). I used that jigsaw for all my curve cutting tasks, as well as the jobs a band saw couldn’t do: pocket cuts, inside circular cutouts, and all manner of trimming inside built-in cabinets and furniture. Nearly 35 years later, when it came time to pick a batch of jigsaws to review for Woodoworker's Journal, I was anxious to try out the “top-shelf” models offered by the best known power tool manufacturers. These include the best offerings from Bosch, DeWALT, Festool, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo and Milwaukee. The Porter-Cable 9543 was slated to be part of this group, but was, unfortunately, recently discontinued. I also tried to include a jigsaw made by the Swiss power tool company Hilti, but they chose not to participate in the article. Instead of discussing each saw individually, I will compare all of their attributes and cutting abilities in two sections: The first contrasts the features and accessories of the seven models. The second section describes the performance tests I put each jigsaw through and reports on how well each model fared.
Whether you’re a seasoned woodworker or DIY pro, you’ll find the woodworking tools you need for the jobsite or around the house. Search woodworking project plans to get some fresh ideas or browse our wide tool selection to find exactly what you need. Outfit your woodworking shop with routers, sanders, table saws, dust collectors, planing tools, and hand tools from bestselling brands including Makita, Festool, Bosch, JET, Powermatic, Rockler, Grizzly, and more.
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