After you have chosen the perfect table saw for your woodshop, the next major purchase one should consider would be a compound miter saw. While not as expensive as a quality table saw, a compound miter saw is invaluable for cutting compound angles (beveled, mitered and combination cuts) on the ends of a piece of stock. Once you develop your ability to make precise cuts with a compound miter saw, you'll find that your circular saw spends a little more time in the drawer than it used to.
With the right tools and materials, what you build is only limited by your imagination and creativity. So why not have a little fun with the kids and teach them something at the same time? Our woodworker tools and woodworking supplies will help you put together an easy birdhouse, squirrel feeder or butterfly house. The kids will love to use our paint samples to add their creative touch, and will enjoy displaying the finished product in the backyard.
The best thing about the Bosch 4100-09 is its portability, as it is simple to set up and take down, and easy to move with its large wheels. Even better, it features a slim frame when folded up, which makes it easy to store. It is a portable table saw, but it is able to rip lumber up to 40.5” long, which is about what you’d expect for a stationary model.
Unfortunately, nothing seemed to be completely aligned from the factory, so right off the bat, we got cuts that were far from straight. After quite a bit of adjusting and fiddling, we managed to get some pretty decent cuts, though not the cleanest or straightest of the saws we tested. We also weren’t thrilled about how long the blade took to slow down once the saw was powered off. Sometimes you want to turn the saw off, adjust your piece, and make a new cut. When the blade just continues spinning, it starts to reduce your productivity.
If you’ve read through those reviews and still feel a little overwhelmed, don’t worry. We’ve created a buyer’s guide because we know it can be very hard just by reading reviews. After all, some models are going to work better for some people than for others, and the only way that you’ll know which one is right for you is by understanding your options when it comes to table saws. By reading this general information about table saws, you should gain the knowledge you need to make a well-informed decision about your future table saw.
This is a great jigsaw, perfect for our home projects. My husband and I are always fixing, building, creating or improving something and this has been dependable and handy. It works great, easy to handle and maneuver. I’ve never used power tools myself but my husband showed me how to use this and I’m loving it. The laser guide and the straight edge attachment are the features we most like. Came complete with different size spare blades, case, attachments, and instructions. It’s exactly what we needed and wanted!
After you have chosen the perfect table saw for your woodshop, the next major purchase one should consider would be a compound miter saw. While not as expensive as a quality table saw, a compound miter saw is invaluable for cutting compound angles (beveled, mitered and combination cuts) on the ends of a piece of stock. Once you develop your ability to make precise cuts with a compound miter saw, you'll find that your circular saw spends a little more time in the drawer than it used to.
Woodworking expert Sandor Nagyszalanczy tested the best jigsaws on the market to determine what features worked well in the shop and which was best overall. I’ve always thought of a jigsaw as a sort of “poor man’s band saw.” During my early woodworking days when I lacked both the funds and space for a band saw, I used the best jigsaw I could find (I borrowed money from a friend to buy it). I used that jigsaw for all my curve cutting tasks, as well as the jobs a band saw couldn’t do: pocket cuts, inside circular cutouts, and all manner of trimming inside built-in cabinets and furniture. Nearly 35 years later, when it came time to pick a batch of jigsaws to review for Woodoworker's Journal, I was anxious to try out the “top-shelf” models offered by the best known power tool manufacturers. These include the best offerings from Bosch, DeWALT, Festool, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo and Milwaukee. The Porter-Cable 9543 was slated to be part of this group, but was, unfortunately, recently discontinued. I also tried to include a jigsaw made by the Swiss power tool company Hilti, but they chose not to participate in the article. Instead of discussing each saw individually, I will compare all of their attributes and cutting abilities in two sections: The first contrasts the features and accessories of the seven models. The second section describes the performance tests I put each jigsaw through and reports on how well each model fared.
Table saws have occupied the central position in most woodworking shops since the development of modern designs after World War II. No other tool does so many things with such clean results in so little time. A table saw purchase should be made carefully to avoid getting either a machine that doesn't meet shop needs, or one that leaves too little money for other important tools. The basic choice is between a contractor saw and a cabinet saw.
Set the saw’s fence. Use the board you’re going to rip to set the fence. Hold the board against the fence and slide it until it makes contact with the jig. Set the fence so the board slides easily but without play between the jig and the fence. Make your cut and then reset the fence for the next cut. If you have a lot of stock to rip from several boards, it pays to rip all the boards to the same width first.
A few initial notes are in order. If buying a contractor saw, I would consider Delta and Jet offerings by that same name. If my work and budget called for a cabinet saw, I would consider the Jet Xacta, Powermatic 66, and Delta Unisaw. Test-drive candidate saws; a few cuts mean more than a month of junk mail. Durability and fence quality are generally not factors. Either saw type will last outlast its owner with reasonable care, and either can be bought with a high quality fence. I would not consider anything less than the contractor saws mentioned above. Cheaper saws make rough cuts, wear out quickly, don't hold their adjustments, and are more prone to dangerous kickbacks. The good taste of money saved turns bitter when your projects take longer and turn out poorly. My intent is to state differences in a non-biased manner, but an attempt has been made to order the items by probable importance.
Milwaukee is a well-trusted name in the world of power tools. This table saw is part of their cordless M18 Fuel system. It sits at the high end of the pricing spectrum, though it’s still a small, tabletop design. For this price, you would almost expect to see a stand of some sort, but not with the Milwaukee. You’re mostly paying for the portability of battery-power. Unfortunately, cordless has its own set of drawbacks. Despite the decent battery life, the power just isn’t quite enough for real job site use. 

Cutting Fast: An obvious question when comparing the performance of different jigsaws is “which saw cuts the fastest?” I created a speed cutting test to determine the answer. First, I fitted each saw with a new Bosch Progressor blade, designed specifically for fast, rough cutting. With the help of my wife, Ann, I timed how long it took each saw to crosscut a 2x6, as shown in the lead photo on page 44. I took several passes, then averaged the times for each saw. I tried to push each saw as hard as I could without bogging its motor down. In the final tally, the premium-priced Festool turned in the fastest average time: 2.74 seconds, notable because this saw doesn’t have the highest-amperage motor or fastest blade stroke speed in this group of jigsaws. The next fastest cutting time was clocked by the Makita — less than a tenth of a second slower than the Festool. Posting a slightly slower time than that was the Bosch, followed (in timed order) by the Metabo, Milwaukee and Hitachi. The DeWALT held up the rear of the pack with a rather slow 4.27-second average time. The second-and-a-half difference between the fastest and slowest saws might not seem like much. But this time can really add up if you have dozens of rafter ends to decoratively jigsaw, or a pile of curved parts to cut out. Vibration: Regardless of how fast a jigsaw cuts, the less vibration it produces, the better. All jigsaws employ some sort of counterbalance system to reduce the up-and-down shaking created by the reciprocating plunger and blade, and some work better than others. In truth, I found it quite difficult to accurately compare the vibration of the various saws in the group, as it varied under different circumstances. For example, the DeWALT felt very smooth-running when idling at full speed. However, when I put the saw to wood, it produced noticeably more vibration. After careful consideration, I found the Bosch and Festool, closely followed by the Milwaukee and Makita, consistently produced the least vibration when cutting a variety of wood types and thicknesses with a variety of blades. That’s not to say that the DeWALT and Hitachi produce unacceptable amounts of vibration, but they just didn’t feel as smooth running as the top saws. At the bottom of the pack, the Metabo jigsaw consistently produced more vibration than any of the other saws. [caption id="attachment_7431" align="aligncenter" width="370"] One of the tests the author put the saws through was cutting melamine, which is fragile and likely to splinter when making close cuts. Cutting cleanly: Getting clean jigsaw cuts with only light splintering, tearout and surface chipping is chiefly a matter of selecting a blade that’s designed for the job. But I still wanted to see just how smooth a cut each saw was capable of producing with a general purpose blade. I fit each saw with a fine-toothed blade and set it to a medium speed with a slight orbit (#1). I then took several cuts with each on a piece of 3/4" melamine — a material notorious for chipping easily. After experimenting with different rates of feed, I selected the cutoffs that displayed the cleanest edge produced by each saw. The Bosch, aided, I suspect, by its precision control guide, left the cleanest cut edges. With cuts only slightly more ragged than the Bosch were the Makita, Festool and DeWALT, followed by the other saws. It’s worth noting that I was able to get a much cleaner cut with all of these saws by fitting them with a special saw blade designed for laminates, as well as an anti-splinter insert. [caption id="attachment_7432" align="aligncenter" width="305"] The better view you have of the cut line, the more accurate your cut will be, and the Bosch jigsaw has the best overall cutting viewpoint. Cutting accurately: The major factors that affect the accuracy of jigsaw cuts are: How well you can see the line of cut and how well the saw’s blade stays square to the workpiece (or at a fixed angle during bevel cuts). Generally, a saw with less of its body overhanging the blade is easier to use, especially when you’re working in cramped quarters or trying to follow a curvaceous line, say when cutting out a scrollwork pattern. The open front end configuration of the Bosch and Metabo make it much easier for me to see the blade without having to crane my neck. The Milwaukee and Hitachi have the most blade obscuring body overhangs, but the former’s built-in LED light helps to improve its line-of-cut visibility. [caption id="attachment_7433" align="aligncenter" width="470"] Many of the jigsaws had a slight waver in them, but the Bosch and Festool saws provided the most square cuts. It’s usually true that the thicker, denser (or more variable in density) a workpiece is, the more likely that a jigsaw’s blade will deflect when cutting it. This is especially true when cutting tight curves. To judge this aspect of cutting accuracy, I crosscut 4x4 lumber with each jigsaw. Most models left edges that wavered in squareness and up-and-down straightness over the length of the cut. The exceptions were the Bosch and Festool models, which left nearly dead square and straight cut edges. It’s safe to assume that such superior performance was likely due to the special blade guide systems on these saws, which helped prevent their long saw blades from deflecting.
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It is my understanding that frame saws are standard to a continental toolkit. Richard’s list of a hard-point handsaw, 10-12” backsaw, and coping saw is a very standard British/American toolkit, that preforms the same roles as the frame saws you detailed. All three are available in every hardware store in America and I assume in Britain, true hardware store back saws are now junk and to get something new that preforms as well an old Disston, like Richard stated, you have to upgrade to likes of Veritas and Lie-Nielsen.
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